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Earth Climate News

Earth Science News. From earthquakes and hurricanes to global warming and energy use, read the latest research news here.

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Climate-friendly food choices protect the planet, promote health, reduce health costs
Increased uptake of plant-based diets in New Zealand could substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions while greatly improving population health and saving the healthcare system billions of dollars in the coming decades, according to a new study.

Here, there and everywhere: Large and giant viruses abound globally
Scientists have uncovered a broad diversity of large and giant viruses that belong to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) supergroup. As a result, virus diversity in this group expanded 10-fold from just 205 genomes, redefining the phylogenetic tree of giant viruses.

Keeping lead out of drinking water when switching disinfectants
Researchers found that the hazards of switching disinfectants in water systems -- increased lead levels -- can be mitigated if the change is done correctly.

Despite less ozone pollution, not all plants benefit
Policies and new technologies have reduced emissions of precursor gases that lead to ozone air pollution, but despite those improvements, the amount of ozone that plants are taking in has not followed the same trend, according to researchers.

Tw writers penned landmark inscriptions in 8th-century BCE Samaria
A new study reveals that only 2 writers penned landmark inscriptions on an 8th-century BCE Samarian ostraca. The discovery illuminates the bureaucratic apparatus of an ancient kingdom of Israel.

What's in Puget sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals
Using a new 'non-targeted' approach, researchers screened samples from multiple regions of Puget Sound to look for potentially harmful compounds that might be present.

Deep diving scientists discover bubbling CO2 hotspot
Hydrologists diving off the coast of the Philippines have discovered volcanic seeps with some of the highest natural levels of C02 ever recorded. The scientists were working in Verde Island Passage, one of the most diverse marine ecosystems in the world and is home to thriving coral reefs.

Coronavirus outbreak in China traced to snakes
Emerging viral infections -- from bird flu to Ebola to Zika infections -- pose major threats to global public health, and understanding their origins can help investigators design defensive strategies against future outbreaks. A new study provides important insights on the potential origins of the most recent outbreak of viral pneumonia in China, which started in the middle of December and now is spreading to Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, and Japan.

Domesticated wheat has complex parentage
Certain types of domesticated wheat have complicated origins, with genetic contributions from wild and cultivated wheat populations on opposite sides of the Fertile Crescent.

Even after death, animals are important in ecosystems
Animal carcasses play an important role in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Scientists have published these findings in PLOS ONE. Carcasses not only provide food for carrion-eating animals. Their nutrients also increase the growth of surrounding plants, which attracts many herbivorous insects and their predators. The researchers recommend relaxing regulations governing the disposal of animal carcasses when applied to conservation areas.

Sea level rise could reshape the United States, trigger migration inland
A new study uses machine learning to project migration patterns resulting from sea-level rise. Researchers found the impact of rising oceans will ripple across the country, beyond coastal areas at risk of flooding, as affected people move inland. Popular relocation choices will include land-locked cities such as Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Denver and Las Vegas. The model also predicts suburban and rural areas in the Midwest will experience disproportionately large influx of people relative to their smaller local populations.

Late Neolithic Italy was home to complex networks of metal exchange
During the 4th and 3rd millennia BC, Italy was home to complex networks of metalwork exchange, according to a new study.

Mosquito-borne diseases could be prevented by skin cream
A skin cream used to treat warts and skin cancer could help protect people against viral diseases such as Zika and dengue, according to new research.

Autoimmunity may explain why an important immune system is absent in many bacteria
New findings reveal how bacterial immune systems can be harmful for their hosts and explain why they are not found in many bacteria.

Most rehabilitating sea turtles with infectious tumors don't survive
Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide. FB leads to tumors on the turtles' eyes, flippers and internal organs and is widespread in warmer climates like Florida. A large-scale study evaluated tumor score, removal and regrowth in rehabilitating green sea turtles with FP in the southeastern US from 2009 to 2017, and found that 75 percent did not survive following admission into a rehabilitation facility, irrespective of whether or not tumor regrowth occurred after surgery.

Americans perceive likelihood of nuclear weapons risk as 50/50 toss-up
It has been 30 years since the end of the Cold War, yet on average, Americans still perceive that the odds of a nuclear weapon detonating on U.S. soil is as likely as a coin toss, according to new research.

Complex rupturing during 2019 Ridgecrest, California, sequence
The 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence, which startled nearby California residents over the 4 July holiday with magnitude 6.4 and magnitude 7.1 earthquakes, included 34,091 earthquakes overall, detailed in a high-resolution catalog created for the sequence.

First ancient DNA from West/Central Africa illuminates deep human past
Scientists have produced the first genome-wide ancient human DNA sequences from west and central Africa.

Researchers reverse HIV latency, important scientific step toward cure
Overcoming HIV latency -- induction of HIV in CD4+ T cells that lay dormant throughout the body - is a major step toward creating a cure for HIV. For the first time, scientists have shown that a new approach can expose latent HIV to attack in two different animal model systems with little or no toxicity.

Scientists identify gene that puts brakes on tissue growth
The planarian flatworm is a simple animal with a mighty ability: it can regenerate itself from nearly every imaginable injury, including decapitation. Scientists have studied these worms for decades to better understand fundamental principles of natural regeneration and repair. One mechanism that is yet unknown is how organisms like these control the proportional scaling of tissue during regeneration. Now, molecular biologists have identified the beginnings of a genetic signaling pathway that puts the brakes on the animal's tissue growth.